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2019

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   Weekly Media Roundup
   The Clearinghouse is moving campuses, to Grafton
   Family Planning 2020 Training Courses
   Sexual Violence Legislation Bill has its first reading
   Transitioning from OOHC for Practitioners: Applying International Evidence
   White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism - Webinar
   Child Matters: 5-Day Programme in Child Protection Studies
   Child Matters: New Zealand Diploma in Child Protection 2020
   Treating the effects of childhood abuse and neglect on young adults
   Weekly Media Roundup
   Family Violence and Sexual Violence Work Programme eUpdate
   Release of Oranga Tamariki Practice Review
   Job Vacancy at RPE: Professional Development Lead
   New Backbone Collective survey open on longer term support and services
   Historical trauma and whānau violence webinar: recording now available
   Children in New Zealand Communities Survey (2019)
   CPAG Summit 2019. Whakamana Tāngata: Where to from here?
   Workshop: Exploring motivational interviewing
   Group Facilitation Training – Intermediate
   Waitematā Family Focus Group Presents: An update from the Ministry of Health
   Child and Youth Wellbeing update - November 2019
   Weekly Media Roundup
   Family violence - The new Act: Legal education session
   New report reveals barriers to prosecution and conviction for sexual violence cases
   New wellbeing resources from Le Va; government work to support Pacific families

Weekly Media Roundup

October 11, 2019 at 12:23 PM

NZ Herald: Collaborative family violence programme making people feel safer

A report into the effectiveness of a family violence programme shows a 48 per cent reduction in children witnessing or being exposed to family violence.

The report, released today, looked at the Integrated Safety Response (ISR) programme which was piloted in Christchurch and Waikato in 2016, and was given $30 million in Budget 2019 to continue through to 2021.

ISR is a multi-agency project designed to ensure the immediate safety of victims and children, and to work with people who use violence to prevent it from happening in the future.

It has dedicated staff, daily risk assessment and triage, and family safety plans.

The report said it was too early to say whether ISR's short-term safety responses has led to a reduction in family violence, but families reported feeling safer and more connected to support networks.

Read more…

 

Stuff: 'Shocking' rate of strangulation by young men could be linked to violent pornography

The "shocking" rate of strangulation of young women by young men could be linked to the popularity of violent pornography, which normalises the behaviour, experts say.

An average of four charges per day were laid in relation to suffocation or strangulation offences during the first six months of this year, data obtained by Stuff showed. 

More than half - 55 per cent - of the perpetrators were men aged 20 to 34. The same proportion of victims were women of the same age.

That's despite people in those demographics making up just 20 per cent of the total population. The age group is also over represented in other family violence statistics.

Read more…

 

Newshub: Women's Refuge calls for Government to target primary school children to curb family violence

Women's Refuge says the Government should now target primary school children in the battle to curb family violence.

It comes as Newshub is given exclusive access to the frontline of our country's 'hidden shame'. 

Read more…

 

Newshub: No evidence family violence getting better - Government

The Government has told Newshub there's no evidence our shameful family violence record is improving. It follows a renewed push on medical professionals to identify signs of harm and abuse.

Here's Newshub's part two of our Because it Matters series on family violence.

The frontline fight against family violence takes many forms. For doctors and nurses it begins in the classroom.

Nikki Burgess is a Violence Intervention Programme, or 'VIP' trainer. At Waitemata DHB, her job is to teach hospital staff, to spot signs of family violence. This includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse.

Read more…

 

Newshub: Duncan Garner says men should not be 'ridiculed' for fear they'll explode

Duncan Garner has said men should not be ridiculed for fear they won't be able to cope with the resulting embarrassment and will explode, but domestic violence charities don't agree.

Garner made the statement on The AM Show on Wednesday, saying some men can't handle a bit of humiliation.

But The AM Show newsreader Amanda Gillies disagreed with Garner's comments, saying there was no excuse to lash out.

Domestic violence campaigner Rob McCann from White Ribbon agreed with Gillies, telling Newshub there's no excuse for violence.

"Violence is not so much about people losing their tempers, it's about power and control.

"Those who use violence, use it as a tool to control the other person, so it's less about being ridiculed, as going back to the tactic that they think works for them - violence."

Read more…

 

The Spinoff: ‘Setting us up to fail’: Kids in state-run care speak out in damning new report

Distressing evidence from children and young people living in ‘locked-in care’ features in a newly released report from the children’s commissioner, who has repeatedly called for the facilities to be shut down.

Read more…

 

NZ Herald: 'Setting us up to fail': Children's stark account of secure homes

WARNING: Graphic content and suicide references

Read more…

 

'We've dropped the ball with about 100 kids in New Zealand' - children's commissioner

Read more…

 

1 News Now: Children's Commissioner calls for urgent changes to state care of children and young people

Read more…

 

Stuff: 1400 child sexual abuse survivors come forward to talk to Royal Commission

The Royal Commission into abuse in care is ramping up as it dives into New Zealand's darkest corners.

The Abuse in Care Royal Commission of Inquiry has so-far had 1400 survivors of abuse in care come forward and suspects they are only the tip of the iceberg.

But the inquiry has been hit by multiple allegations, including that a child-sex offender attended meetings of abuse survivors and a call for commissioners to resign.

Read more…

 

Stuff: Judge encourages survivors of state and faith-based abuse to come forward

Coral Shaw spent decades as a judge, presiding over criminal cases in Auckland and governing employment tribunals for the United Nations in New York.

She was set to retire, the second attempt in her judicial career.

That was until she was asked to be a commissioner for the inquiry into state and faith-based care, an inquiry touted as the largest in the world given its scope and terms of reference.

On her return home to the Waipa District, Shaw was approached by friend and former chair of the Royal Commission inquiry, Sir Anand Satyanand.

Shaw didn't lead a sheltered life, but she had no idea thousands of children were abused in state and faith-based care.

Read more…

 

Newsroom: Survivors frustrated by commission’s ‘cone of silence’

Warning: This story discusses issues related to rape and sexual violence.

Survivors have extended an olive branch to those running the Royal Commission of Inquiry into state abuse. Laura Walters reports on growing frustrations over a lack of communication a fortnight on from revelations survivors were exposed to a convicted child sex offender.

Read more…

 

Stuff: Whānau of killed Whanganui mother plan anti-violence campaign

Even as whānau and friends gathered to mourn a young Whanganui mother, the latest victim in a string of violent deaths in the city, they were planning how they could help prevent similar deaths.

Feona McKay-Patea, 23, was found dead at a Lee St property on Thursday last week after police visited the home following up on a missing person complaint.

McKay-Patea's tangi was held on an overcast and sombre Tuesday at the Kaiwhaiki Marae, just north of Whanganui.

The narrow country lane was filled with cars, as her loved ones come together to celebrate the life of the gentle kōhanga reo volunteer and dedicated mother of two little boys.

Read more…

 

Stuff: Whānau speak out after violent death of Whanganui woman Feona McKay-Patea

Read more…

 

NZ Herald: Family of young Whanganui mum killed last week take stand against domestic violence

Read more…

 

Stuff: National Portrait: Top lawyer for Oranga Tamariki Erin Judge's unlikely rise

As a teenager, Erin Judge ran away from childhood trauma. Now an adult, she runs towards it as a lawyer charged with protecting vulnerable children. By Tommy Livingston.

Read more…

 

The Spinoff: Emily Writes: Netflix’s Unbelievable is a sadly believable story

Emily Writes watches Netflix’s new US-set series Unbelievable and can’t help be reminded of events back home.

Rape is the crime that people want to believe doesn’t happen. There’s no other crime where people so routinely disbelieve victims. If a man is beaten up in the street nobody would ask what he was wearing, whether he yelled no when his nose was punched in, was he drinking?

As Marie’s lawyer muses in Unbelievable, “Nobody ever accuses a robbery victim of lying or someone who says he’s carjacked – it just doesn’t happen. But when it comes to sexual assault…”

Because, in any other crime, you don’t have to be a perfect victim. You don’t have to defend your right to your body. If you are raped, and you choose to report, you will be put on trial regardless of whether your case even makes it out of the police station.

Read more…

 

Timaru Courier: ‘Hey Bro’ aids perpetrators

An organisation providing support services for male perpetrators of family violence visited South Canterbury last week.

Representatives from Christchurch-based He Waka Tapu Trust’s “Hey Bro” programme were at a Mental Health Awareness Week event at Arowhenua marae last Wednesday.

The pilot scheme also has a nationwide 24/7 helpline, 800Hey Bro (0800439-276), which can be contacted by anyone feeling they are at risk of harming a family member.

Hey Bro phone co-ordinator Shannel Fiaui said while there was a “a lot support” for victims of family violence, not much was available for male perpetrators.

Read more…

 

The Spinoff: Thank you to the early childcare centre that changed my child’s life

Gemma Bowker Wright pays tribute to the Wellington childcare centre that welcomed her son, and calls on the country to better support the people who care for our children.

Read more…

 

Stuff: State care sex abuse complainants get $60,000 payout and apology from Oranga Tamariki

Oranga Tamariki has paid $60,000 in compensation to two men who complained of historic sexual abuse at a drama school run by a well-known New Zealand actor. 

Jacob Mayhew told Stuff he was raped and sexually abused repeatedly by another resident a decade ago during his time at Te Rākau in Wellington, run by theatre and television star Jim Moriarty at the time.

Mayhew's brother, who didn't want to be named, also said he was sexually abused by the same resident, a 15-year-old boy, during their stay. 

Read more…

 

Stuff: British backpacker Grace Millane's family donate handbags to domestic violence victims

The family of British backpacker Grace Millane, who was allegedly murdered in Auckland, has donated a collection of handbags to victims of domestic violence. 

Millane's family and friends filled donated bags with essential and luxury items, the BBC reported

Millane, 22, from Essex, vanished in Auckland in December 2018. Her body was later found in West Auckland's Waitākere Ranges.

A 27-year-old man, who has interim name suppression, denies her murder and will go to trial next month.

Read more…



Category: News Media