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Weekly Media Round up

February 26, 2016 at 8:40 AM

Outdated attitudes from agencies not helping family violence victims - report:

An outdated attitude towards family violence, held by some Government agencies, is failing victims and triggering inadequate responses, a committee has found.

The Family Violence Death Review Committee's fifth annual report says agencies need to take the onus off victims to keep themselves safe.

The committee is an independent body that advises the Health Quality and Safety Commission on measure to reduce family violence deaths.

Read more...

See also:

Better coordination needed on domestic violence information

 

Costly government programmes having 'no impact' on domestic violence - Bill English:

Finance Minister Bill English is frustrated over lack of progress on domestic violence and other social problems, despite programmes costing hundreds of millions of dollars.

English said that the public service was having "no impact" on some costly social problems such as dom

 

The Government's social investment unit, which has a budget of about $6 million over two years, is spearheading a Government drive to make better use of data and software tools.

Read more...

 

Oh I bashed her: Shaun Kenny-Dowall 'joked to his mother' about ex's injuries:

Sydney Roosters centre Shaun Kenny-Dowall joked to his mother that he had "bashed" his girlfriend when she turned up at a family lunch with a visible bruise on her arm, a court has been told.

Jessica Peris took to the stand in the Sydney District Court on Wednesday to give evidence against her former boyfriend, who is facing 11 domestic violence charges including assault, stalking, intimidation and destroying property.

Read more...

 

NZ needs to do more on human rights:

New Zealand showed some leadership on human rights in the past year but needs to do much more, an annual report card by Amnesty International says.

The "State of the World's Human Rights" report, released this afternoon, applauded New Zealand's work on the international stage as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council.

Read more...

 

An inside look at Auckland's specialised Family Violence Court:

Police receive a domestic violence notification every five minutes. Reporter Elesha Edmonds takes a look at Family Violence Court and how it's designed to engage with offenders and get them the help they need.

Read more...

 

A new report is calling on Government agencies to change their approach toward helping family violence victims, to ...
Mario Ondris 123RF

A new report is calling on Government agencies to change their approach toward helping family violence victims, to prevent deaths.

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An outdated attitude towards family violence, held by some Government agencies, is failing victims and triggering inadequate responses, a committee has found. 

The Family Violence Death Review Committee's fifth annual report says agencies need to take the onus off victims to keep themselves safe. 

The committee is an independent body that advises the Health Quality and Safety Commission on measure to reduce family violence deaths. 

National's Minister for Social Development Anne Tolley, has welcomed the Family Violence Death Review Committee's fifth ...
Hagen Hopkins

National's Minister for Social Development Anne Tolley, has welcomed the Family Violence Death Review Committee's fifth annual report.

Its report called for a number of changes to the way victims were dealt with, including a stop to questions over what victims were doing to keep themselves safe from abusive partners. 

READ MORE:
Government puts microscope on 'horrific' domestic violence problem
Amy Adams: Together, we can turn the tide on family violence

It also recommended practitioners provide long-term assistance to victims "rather than one-off safety advice", and called for "more focus on the person using violence, in addition to the victim".

Justice Minister Amy Adams said New Zealand's family violence statistics were
KIRK HARGREAVES/FAIRFAX NZ

Justice Minister Amy Adams said New Zealand's family violence statistics were "something none of us should be happy to accept".

Changing the behaviours of perpertrators was the most effective way to prevent family violence, it found.

Committee co-chair Professor Dawn Elder said collective thinking on family violence needed to change. 

It was not a series of isolated incidents affecting an individual victim. Rather, family violence was "a pattern of abusive behaviour used by an individual and between individuals that can have multiple victims".

Agencies were culpable for some of this thinking, which had led to ineffective responses in the past. 

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"Victims do ask for help – often repeatedly – but our [committee] reviews indicate that they often need to get a more helpful and informed response. There are many barriers to help-seeking that need to be identified and understood," Elder said.

Some organisations still did not see the link between intimate partner abuse and child abuse. 

"If a person is abusing a child, [committee] reviews have found they are likely to be abusing the child's primary carer as well.

Also where there is intimate partner abuse and children are present in the home, then by definition there has been exposure to emotional abuse and the children are at increased risk of being physically abused as well.

"These are entangled forms of family violence and must always be identified and addressed together."

The report said women in New Zealand experienced a higher rate of violence from their partners than in 14 other OECD countries. Over a 10 year period, there were 312 family violence deaths in this country. 

Co-chair Professor Denise Wilson said agencies needed to work together much more. 

That included the Ministries of Health, Social Development, Justice and Police, as well as Corrections Te Puni Kokiri and a number of Non-Government organisations. 

A ministerial group on family and sexual violence, led by Justice Minister Amy Adams and Social Development Minister Anne Tolley, was "encouraging". 

Both Ministers welcomed the report, and agreed with its findings. 

"The report identifies that our family violence system is one formed from default rather than design and highlights the opportunity that transformational change presents," said Adams. 

An attitude shift needed to occur across all agencies and New Zealand.

"I think it's far too easy across large tracts of New Zealand, to ignore and turn a blind eye to the fact that our family violence stats are appalling, and some of the worst in the world." 

Tolley said tackling and reducing domestic violence was a top Government priority.

The Government spent $1.4 billion in this area. Tolley said a review of that spending found "we need to improve, and that while good work was being done there is fragmentation and duplication of some services".

No single action would solve issues, it required wholesale change over a number of years, she said.

A paper would be going to Cabinet in the next few weeks outlining the whole of Government strategy.

Need Help?

If any of the issues raised here are personal for you and you would like to talk to someone, you can contact the following services for information or help. They are all free.

New Zealand Police

 

111

If you have immediate safety concerns for yourself or anyone else, dial 111 and ask for Police.

Are You Ok? Helpline

 

0800 456 450

The helpline can provide you with information and put you in touch with services in your own region for those experiencing or perpetrating family violence. The helpline operates every day of the year and is open from 9am to 11pm.

Child, Youth & Family

 

0508 FAMILY 0508 326 459

Fax: 09 914 1211 Email: cyfcallcentre@cyf.govt.nz

If you think a child is in immediate danger – phone the Police on 111. If you suspect child abuse or neglect, or are worried about a child or young person, you can call our free phone number 24 hours a day, any day of the year, and talk to one of our social workers. You can also send a notification to us by fax or email.

Women's Refuge

 

0800 REFUGE, 0800 733 843

If you're a victim or are concerned about someone you know, you can call Women's Refuge helpline for information, advice and support about family violence. The helpline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

 - Stuff



Category: News Media